Power Outages

Power De-energization

Based on certain conditions, which include Red Flag Warnings, winds, low humidity, fuel loads, and observable conditions, power de-energization may occur anywhere in Sonoma County. Power could be out for a number of days depending on conditions.

Print this list and keep it handy in case the power is turned off.  Remember, the conditions that cause PG&E to turn off the power also mean we have a high risk of wildfire during this time.

For information about wildfire preparedness and Red Flag Warnings, see Wildfire Readiness.

Power OutagePrepare for possible loss of power:

Here are 8 things you can do ahead of time to get ready for the potential loss of power:

  1. Make sure PG&E has your current contact information. Update your contact information with PG&E online or call (866) 743-6589. If you have lifesaving medical equipment:
    1. Verify PG&E has you registered with their Medical Baseline Allowance program,
    2. Plan to have back-up power sources for all critical medical needs (including refrigerated lifesaving medications), and
    3. Have pre-established connections with nearby family or neighbors to assist if needed.
  2. Have a back-up charging system for cell phones and keep devices fully charged at all times.
  3. Consider alternate power generation choices for your home or critical business systems. Be sure to follow all safety instructions for stand-alone power generators.  See Portable Generator Safety Tips for more information.
  4. Identify a place you can go to cool off, if necessary.
  5. Keep some cash on hand (credit/debit stations, and ATMs may be without power).
  6. Check and update your emergency kit and supplies (include hard copies of critical information and life-saving prescriptions).
  7. Learn more about Public Safety Power Shutoffs in your area and work with your neighbors to make sure everyone is ready.
  8. Stay informed during disasters and sign up for SoCoAlerts.

If PG&E has warned of a power shutdown:

If PG&E is planning to turn off your electricity within the next 48 hours, here are some important things to do now:

  1. Make sure cell phones and back-up batteries are fully charged. Check your battery-operated radio and flashlights.
  2. Fill up your car with gas and leave it out of the garage. (You should also learn how to manually open the garage door!)
  3. Place your go bag or emergency kit in the car so if you’ll be ready if you need to leave in a hurry.
  4. Fill some water bottles (3/4 full only) and place them in the freezer to help keep things cool (remember, if you leave the doors of the refrigerator closed it will remain cool for many hours).
  5. Make sure you have cash.
  6. Check with PG&E for information about their plans and if they are going to open a community resource center.
  7. Check with your local government for cooling centers that may be available.
  8. Contact your neighbors who may need help and help them get ready.

If your power is out:

  1. Check to see which of your information sources are working (NOAA Radio, Internet news sites, alert and warning apps).
  2. SoCoAlerts will send messages if evacuations are ordered. If you are in a high-risk wildfire area, stay alert – warning devices may not work without power.
  3. Use your cell phone sparingly to preserve power. Text when possible, in lieu of voice calls. Keep family up to date about how you are doing.
  4. Keep hydrated and seek out cooling centers if needed.
  5. Try to keep your refrigerator doors closed. Use the most perishable items first. Items which fully thaw (above 40 degrees) must be used within 4 hours or thrown out.
  6. If you have a generator, be sure to follow safety instructions and use only as needed to save fuel. Always allow the generator to cool completely before refueling.
  7. If you have relatives or friends in other areas that still have power, take this opportunity to visit them.
  8. Check on your neighbors and help each other stay safe.